September 17, 2021

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Voices of fear and protest against Afghans who aided foreign forces

Voices of fear and protest against Afghans who aided foreign forces

The Taliban have intensified their manhunt for Afghanistan, which has worked with foreign forces, warning of a secret UN document, while voices of protest are emerging in Kabul, such as Commander Masood’s son or protesters.

The report, written by a panel of UN risk assessers and consulted by the AFP on Thursday, contains “priority lists” of individuals the Taliban would like to arrest, despite assurances that the rebels would not retaliate against their opponents.

According to the document, high-ranking officials in the Afghan Armed Forces, Police and Intelligence are at high risk.

The report says the Taliban have “targeted and gone door-to-door” with individuals and their family members who want to arrest them. He says insurgents are screening individuals seeking access to Kabul airport and that they have set up checkpoints in major cities.

“They are targeting the families of those who refuse to surrender and continue to punish, according to Sariya,” Christian Nelleman, director of the expert panel, told AFP, the Norwegian Center for Global Analysis. “We expect individuals who have served in the US and NATO forces and their allies and their families to be threatened with torture and execution.”

“It will further affect the ability of Western intelligence services, their networks, their methods and future Taliban to face both IS (Islamic State group) and other terrorist threats,” he added.

– Rush to the airport –

In several parts of Azadabad (east) and Kabul, protesters waved the national flag and violated the Taliban on the streets on Thursday, the 102nd anniversary of Afghanistan’s independence.

Ahmed Masood, the most famous enemy of the Taliban and the Soviets, was assassinated by al-Qaeda commander Ahmed Shah Masood on September 9, 2001, and called on to protest with former Vice President Amrullah Saleh, who was “ready” to walk in (his) father’s footsteps.

From the Banjir Valley (northeast of Kabul), the last area not controlled by the Taliban, he claims to have joined the army “disgusted by the surrender of their commanders”. In an article published in the Washington Post, he asked about weapons and ammunition in the United States.

In Kabul, thousands of people have gathered at the airport since the Taliban captured the capital on Sunday after a 20-year war against the United States and NATO. Trapped between Taliban checkpoints and a barricade set up by the US military at the airport, the country’s only evacuation is believed to have found thousands of Afghan civilians fleeing.

Many Afghans tried to leave near the embassies but could not get inside.

The G7 and many other UN agencies have called on the Taliban to allow Afghans and foreigners to cross. When the US State Department released the same message, the Pentagon indicated that the situation was improving.

The United States has deployed 6,000 troops to protect Kabul airport and evacuate about 30,000 Americans and Afghanistan. According to the Pentagon, they have evacuated more than 7,000 people since Saturday.

Many countries, including many Europeans (Spain, France, the United Kingdom, etc.), carry out expulsions.

– Suggestions for a government –

Jabihullah Mujahid said on Thursday that the new regime, which had ordered the release of “all political prisoners (…) without any restrictions or conditions” on Twitter, was continuing consultations to establish a government in which “all parties” would be involved. A speaker.

Taliban leaders discussed the issue with former President Hamid Karzai (2001-2014) and former Vice President Abdullah Abdullah.

Jabihullah Mujahid on Tuesday vowed that there would be “many differences” in the way the Taliban ruled from 1996 to 2001, until they were overthrown by a US-led coalition after the September 11, 2001 attacks.

At that time, they imposed the most severe version of Islamic law. Women could not work or study, and thieves and murderers faced terrible punishments.

They stated that they wanted to establish “good diplomatic relations” with all countries but that they refused to interfere in their religious doctrines. China, Russia, Turkey and Iran have previously issued signals for opening. Western nations are waiting to be judged by “actions”.

Because many Afghans are distrustful of the international community. Posters and photos of women decorating shop windows in Kabul have been hidden or destroyed.

Journalists – four of them wanted – and former staff of Western organizations and embassies say they are scared.

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