September 17, 2021

Global Real News

Complete News World

Mali: Fifty civilians killed by suspected jihadists

According to the provisional report of the authorities, about fifty civilians were killed in attacks on jihadists in three neighboring areas and near the border with Niger on Sunday in northern Mali.

A document from a local province consulted by the AFP states that 51 people were killed simultaneously against the villages of Karov, Otagawa and Dodgeft in the Gao region. The news also added that houses were looted and set on fire and cattle were taken away.

“Terrorists entered the villages and massacred everyone,” a security official told AFP. “Terrorists” means that the authorities are generally jihadists.

All sources interviewed by AFP spoke anonymously for security reasons.

“In Caro, 20 civilians were killed. In Ouatagouna, 14 civilians were killed and in the small village of Daoutegeft, other civilians were killed,” said an official in the area.

He also said that an elected officer from the fourth area had attacked his village. An army official said an army unit had been sent to the area to help the people.

However, an official of the Malian NGO stressed that communication with the isolated areas was poor. The region, like parts of northern Mali, has been largely disconnected from networks in recent days due to allegations of telecommunications infrastructure.

Surrounded by poverty and land, Mahali has been mired in security and political turmoil since 2012.

All sorts of violence and atrocities have claimed thousands of lives, including separatist and now jihadi uprisings led by groups linked to al-Qaeda and the Islamic State organization, and security forces. Civilian and military deaths and hundreds of UN casualties.

READ  Afghanistan: Thousands of soldiers flee the Taliban in Tajikistan

– State failure –

From northern Mali, the violence spread to the center of the country, and then to neighboring Burkina Faso and Niger, particularly to the general public.

The Ministry of Communications announced on Monday that at least 12 Burkina Faso soldiers had been killed and eight wounded on Sunday during an attack by suspected jihadists in the northwestern part of the country, near the border with Mali.

Allion Tyne, an independent United Nations expert on the human rights situation in Mali, last week warned of a “serious and persistent security breach” in Mali because the “critical gateway” had been crossed and the Malian state’s presence at risk was burning.

At the end of the 11-day trip, he spoke about the “failure of government institutions”, the support group for Islam and Muslims (GSIM, or JNIM, all attacks on civilians affiliated with al-Qaeda), the Islamic State Organization in the Great Sahara (EIGS) and Other armed groups, as well as kidnappings, gang rapes but the violence of the security forces to protect civilians.

The 258 human rights violations committed by armed groups and social militants in the first six months of 2021 already represent 88% of the total by 2020.

He added that the UN mission (Minusma) had “recorded 43 illegal, abbreviated or arbitrary executions by the Malian Security and Security Forces (FDSM) between April 1 and June 30, 2021”.

Mali has been in two military coups in a year. The dominance of kernels made security one of its priorities, unable to stop the vortex. He promised to give way to the elected public at the beginning of 2022.

READ  Sudanese Irrigation Minister visits Ethiopia